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Danger zones at home for seniors

For seniors, independence and safety are both important


Growing old is a natural circle of life but gradual ageing also means a higher risk of seniors falling. Falls cause serious injuries like hip fractures, broken bones, and head injuries – all of which lead to a decrease in abilities because their bodies usually aren’t able to recover fully. This means needing extended stays in nursing homes or assisted living facilities or a significant amount of in-home help.

In this guide, you will discover the 3 most common areas of housing that present dangers to the elderly. Also included are some safety measures for protecting your older loved ones from these potential hazards.

 

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1. The Bathroom

For seniors, the bathroom is one of the most dangerous areas in the home. Accidents and falls are common, and bathroom fixtures can be hazardous. The accumulation of soap scum on surfaces, the presence of condensation, and the presence of hot water may all contribute to slips, falls, and similar injuries.

Here are some other tips for making your bathroom safer:

- Install grab bars in the shower and near the toilet.

- Place bathroom safety assistive devices at the toilet to help with sitting or standing

- Use a nonslip mat in the tub or shower.

- Keep the floor clean and dry to prevent slips and falls.

- Make sure all electrical appliances are properly grounded.

- Use night lights to help you see at night.

- Install faucets and handles that are easy to turn on and off.

- Keep cleaning products and medicines out of reach.

 

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2. The Kitchen

The kitchen is the second most dangerous area in the house for seniors. accidents and falls are common, and the risk of serious injury is high. There are a few key areas in the kitchen that pose a particularly high risk for seniors such as the stove, the sink, a messy counter top and the floor. 

Here are some other tips for making your kitchen safer:

- Keep the surrounding area of the stove clear of flammable items.

- Install a smoke alarm system.

- Use an induction stove instead of a gas stove.

- Make sure all electrical appliances are properly grounded.

- Avoid having a messy and cluttered countertop.

- Use a nonslip mat at the sink.

 

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3. Steps Or Staircase

For most people, taking a fall here and there may cause a few bruises or a scrape at best. For seniors, however, falls are a bit more frequent and can be much more harmful. A senior falling down the stairs should never be taken lightly and should be taken to a doctor immediately even for the slightest pain.

If a senior is experiencing a decrease in strength and a weak sense of balance, they should not be climbing staircases and families should consider having the senior's bedroom moved to the ground floor for several reasons:

- Safer for the senior.

- Convenient to attend to their needs.

- Easier for paramedics to transport the senior if there is an emergency.

 

Preventing a fall is always better than trying to cure the problem after it has already occurred because falls can have very severe consequences for seniors, including expensive surgeries and a loss of independence. Although it is nearly impossible to fully prevent any falls from happening, by taking these simple precautions, you can make your home a little safer for yourself and your loved ones.

 

25 Oct 2022

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